This full day tour from London starts when you’re picked up at your hotel by a London black taxi driver – the world’s finest!  Acclaimed the world over for having to complete the fiendishly difficult ‘Knowledge of London’ series of tests before they are awarded their coveted green badge, your London black taxi driver is required to know literally thousands of streets, landmarks and places of interest. Every single London black taxi driver has been rigorously vetted, so you know you’re in safe hands too.

Climb Glastonbury Tor

Your cabbie will drop you off at your starting point where your tour bus awaits you, offering you the kind of comfort you deserve: all coaches feature reclining leather seats, air conditioning, and panoramic windows so you can sit back and enjoy the stunning views of the English countryside.

The first stop of the day is the magnificent, enthralling Stonehenge. This iconic structureexcalibur has puzzled archaeologists and historians for centuries, and its true purpose remains a mystery to this day. How did the stones get transported thousands of years ago from so far away? What is the secret of its remarkable layout? We’ll be exploring this UNESCO World Heritage Site with your qualified tour guide, who will escort you into the cinema for a 360- degree experience of what it would be like to be in the centre of Stonehenge from its beginnings 5,000 years ago.

You’ll also be able to view the many artefacts recovered from the tombs dotted around the surrounding landscape of lush, rolling green hills, as well as a nearly complete skeleton of someone who lived in the area before Stonehenge was even begun.

Outside the monument there will be a chance to explore some of the huts recreated from findings at the nearby “Durrington Walls” 2 miles away. You’ll get the chance to step into the huts and see how the people who built Stonehenge lived. From here we hop on to the courtesy bus that takes us up to the site of Stonehenge itself.

day-tour-image-24The remarkable thing about Stonehenge is its unique design and the craftsmanship involved in building this extraordinary site, and your guide is on hand to talk about some of the theories, and point out the site’s distinctive features.

From here we push deeper into what is often referred to as Arthur’s Britain. The countryside gradually becomes hillier and more remote as modern civilisation melts away behind us. We pass iron age fortresses, doll-like thatched cottages, ancient landmarks, villages with old gaols and a pub that was run by a notorious highwayman.

From here we approach Glastonbury and the much-photographed Tor (hill) that silently Glastonbury Abbeydominates the landscape for miles around. We’ll pull into the small nearby town for our fish and chip lunch at an award-winning restaurant that has been a family business for over a century. From here we’ll cross the road into Glastonbury Abbey to search for the final resting place of King Arthur himself. According to contemporary reports, the monks who lived at the Abbey discovered the tomb of Arthur following a fire. But to many people, Arthur is not dead at all – he sleeps nearby ready to awake when England is in peril. Stories of Arthur abound here in Glastonbury – the Isle of Apples – as do legends of fairy folk, saints and magic, all weaving through the landscape and remembering the deeds of long ago.

Our tour continues with a visit to the revered Chalice Well, where you can take for free the healing waters from the Lion’s head spring. Here too is an example of the Glastonbury thorn brought from the Holy Land by Joseph of Arimathea. The Chalice well itself has never been known to dry out – not even in the most severe droughts – and it was here that Joseph hid the Holy Grail. Since that time, people have travelled from far and wide to benefit from its healing properties.

Now for some serious hiking – but only if you want to! This is your chance to walk to the top of the town of Glastonbury and marvel at the magnificent views across to the city of Wells, Porlock, Dunster and even across the Bristol Channel to the principality of Wales – the land of the dragon. The tower of St. Michael stands as testimony to the medieval monks’ determination and engineering skills. But the tower holds a gruesome secret, and there’s an intriguing story of an encounter with the fairy kingdom too!

Avebury Stone CircleTime to leave now for our final stop of the day and the village of Avebury. On our way there we’ll see a striking white horse carved into the hillside to commemorate the triumph of an English King over the Vikings back in the 800s. We’ll also be driving past an old country mansion which became the subject of a notorious (and true!) murder mystery, a place that is in fact at the origin of the enthusiasm for detective novels going back to the 1800s that kick-started the popularity of the detective novel, captivating the imagination of readers and amateur sleuths on both sides of the Atlantic.

Then onto Avebury.

Measuring 400 metres across its diameter, the stone circle of Avebury is the largest in the world and – like Stonehenge – is a world heritage site. We’ll have time to explore the site together with your guide who tell you about the barber stone and the haunted pub, and will show you some great photo spots. We’ll also be doing some dowsing at the site to discover the power of the stones.  There’ll be time to pop in to the famous ‘henge’ shop and find out about crystals and crop circles, and you might even want to take home some dowsing rods of your own… From here we’ll get back on our coach that will take us past the mysterious pre-historic mound of Silbury Hill – the largest in Europe.

We drive back via the lovely market towns of Marlborough and Hungerford. We’ll see Marlborough College, the school attended by the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton and Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie amongst others. Here, too, is another prehistoric mound which, according to legend, conceals the Round Table along with Merlin the Magician.

We’ll be joining the freeway back to London and drive past Windsor Castle, the venue for the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in May 2018, and you’ll be dropped off at Gloucester Road. Should any passengers require onward transfers then please speak to the guide beforehand.

Whats Included

Fully Guided Lecture Standard Tour

Admission to Stonehenge

Admission to Glastonbury Abbey

Climb Glastonbury Tor

All Travel in Luxury Mini-Bus from Central London

View and book this magical day tour here

Stonehenge Guided Tours
The Stonehenge Experts!
www.StonehengeTours.com

 

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Superhenge’ Found Buried Near Stonehenge
A row of huge stones stood some 4,000 years ago just two miles from Stonehenge, dwarfing the iconic stone circle.

Dubbed “Superhenge,” the site is five times bigger than the iconic stone circle and lies buried three feet beneath a thick, grassy bank at a Stone-Age enclosure known as Durrington Walls. Full story

* This new Half Day tour departs from Bath. Visiting Stonehenge, Durrington Walls, Woodhenge, the newly discovered ‘Superhenge’ and Lacock Village in the Cotswolds *

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We drive through the beautiful Wiltshire countryside to Stonehenge . This amazing monument was first mentioned as one of the wonders of Britain only seventy years after the Norman Conquest. It has aroused awe and curiosity ever since. This is your chance to experience it for yourself. During the journey to Stonehenge your driver guide will give you commentary on the sites we pass and there is also plenty of information for you to browse through. If English is not your first language there are audio presentations at the monument in all major languages

SUPERHENGE

´We also take a look at Durrington Walls where nearly 100 stones 4,500 years old, some measuring 15ft (4.5m) in length, were discovered under 3ft of earth at Durrington Walls using geophysical imaging technology. Experts think it may have surrounded traces of springs and a dry valley leading into the River Avon. Close by is Woodhenge which consisted of six concentric rings of wooden post holes within a bank and ditch, now marked by concrete posts. In the middle of the circle the grave of a three year old girl was found suggesting possible ritual sacrifice. We firmly believe that viewing these other two henges ´complete the circle´ – if you will pardon the pun – and help to show you that Stonehenge is not ´just a bunch of rocks in the middle of nowhere´ !

On a clear day we get a view of the Westbury White Horse.

Lacock National Trust Village

This wonderful village consists of properties which date from the 13th and 18th centuries. It was once a prosperous woollen town but now it seems like a village trapped in time. There has been no major building here in the last 200 years so you really feel as if you’re stepping back into English history.

If you’re interested in film locations Lacock has been used many times. It became the town of Meriton in the BBC production of Pride and Prejudice and more recently Downton Abbey (second episode of final series). The Abbey was also used in the filming of the first two Harry Potter movies. We will take you to Godric’s Hollow, the home of James and Lilly Potter (Harry’s parents) and to professor Horace Slughorn’s house from Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince. Other film credits for Lacock include Emma, Moll Flanders, Robin of Sherwood/Robin Hood, Randall & Hopkirk (Deceased), The Mayor of Casterbridge, The Other Boleyn Girl, Cranford, and The Wolfman.

Your fully guided return mini coach tour includes:
Stonehenge Stone Circle
Stonehenge Visitor Centre
Durrington Walls
Woodhenge
Newly discovered Superhenge
Lacock Village
The Cotswolds
Chalk Hill-Figures
Crop Circles (seasonal)

Book this small group tour here

Stonehenge Guided Tours
The Original and Best Stonehenge Tour Operator

A unique look at the dramatic landscapes, rich history and picturesque villages surrounding Stonehenge, Salisbury and the Plain.

Binky.jpgFrom our Land Rover Discovery (As used on Safaris the world over) you will enjoy an on and off road experience, resulting in dramatic vantage points, unique plants and animals and visits to places around Salisbury and Stonehenge that your average tour bus just cannot match. In the company of our fully qualified and licensed drivers, you are sure to have a blast.

“A unique look at the dramatic landscapes, rich history and picturesque villages surrounding Stonehenge, Salisbury and the Plain”

Our Journey begins from Salisbury train station (local hotels or combined with our Stonehenge private tours or popular helicopter flights), this tour takes in Wiltshire’s delightful villages such as Wilton, Wishford, the Langfords and Stoford offering a picturesque view of Salisbury unavailable from the usual bus tours.

“Capture your memories at stunning locations. Down small roads and byways that are inaccessible by Coach, Bus or Car”

From here we take a short trip down the A303 before turning off at Yarnbury Castle. (the first view of the Plain is breathtaking we promise) Following some very rough byways (don’t worry we go slowly and our Land Rover is more than up to the job) we stop next to Parsonage Down Nature Reserve for more spectacular views and a short photo and refreshment break, before climbing back in and making the trip across the Plain as only a Land Rover can! We pop out just west of the tiny village of Shrewton and make our way via Larkhill (Home of the Royal Artillery and birthplace of the Royal Air force) to see an alternative view of Stonehenge (This view puts the stones in a real perspective, set in the landscape and seen as they would have been for thousands of years) One last off road trip will see us hit the roads again and make our way back to Salisbury for the end of the tour.

A 2 hour tour will cost £120 with a £10 supplement per person up to a maximum of 6 people. each tour can be tailored to suit your taste if needed.

Guests can be driven to Stonehenge visitors centre or perhaps Durrington Walls and collected at a pre-arranged time for ongoing travel at additional cost.

A four hour tour will cost £230 with a £10 supplement per person up to a maximum of 6 people and includes a more detailed glimpse at the monuments above with the opportunity to explore the area on foot with one of our guides and really get a sense of what the plain can offer.

All tours will include refreshments which include biscuits and a flask of tea or coffee.

Click here for our unique 4*4 Stonehenge Safari experience

Gift Voucher(s) also available

Customised Private Tour Service
This 2 hour landrover experience can be booked separately or easily combined with our customised private tours with departures from London, Southampton, Salisbury, Bath or Oxford.

Contact us for a quote – it may be cheaper than you think: experts@stonehengetours.com

The Stonehenge Experts
www.StonehengeTours.com

Providing unique experiences since 1995

‘THE STONE MONUMENT IS ICONIC, BUT IT’S ONLY A LITTLE PART OF THE WHOLE THING’

The New York Times has an interesting roundup of recent discoveries made at and around Stonehenge that could shed new light on the famous monument and the people who built it nearly 5,000 years ago. Last month, archaeologists dug up an ancient house at an area called Blick Mead about a mile from Stonehenge. Built around 4300 BC, they believe the house is one of the oldest in England. In September, a team of archaeologists using radar imaging found what they believe are 90 standing stones buried at another nearby site called Durrington Walls. Teams also think they’ve found where Stonehenge’s builders lived around 2600 BC. Fatty acids still inside ancient pots show the people of the time had a “very meat-heavy diet” of grilled and boiled pork and beef with some apples, berries, and hazelnuts.

Stonehenge private viewing

Our Stonehenge private access tours get you inside the inner circel. Visit Stonehenge with the experts!

But despite the recent discoveries, the major question remains: Why was Stonehenge built? Some archaeologists believe it was a “land of the dead” used to honor the builders’ ancestors, the Times reports. Others believe it was the opposite: an area renowned for its life-giving healing properties. A team used an isotope contained in ancient cattle teeth to deduce people came to the area around Stonehenge from far and wide. Archaeologists are also left wondering if Stonehenge was built atop a site that was already revered by ancient peoples. For example, charcoal and bones found in nearby pits left by large posts—possibly totem poles—date back to nearly 8000 BC. “The stone monument is iconic,” one archaeologist says. “But it’s only a little part of the whole thing.” Read the full story here.


Learn all about the new discoveries on one of our Stonehenge tours
Stonehenge Guided Tours
http://www.StonehengeTours.com

What we learned about Stonehenge this week is that it wasn’t built for summer celebrations.

Operation Stonehenge: a BBC programme investigated the prehistoric monument

Stonehenge Photo: Alamy

First reports of the discovery of a mass of huge stones buried near Stonehenge, appearing to be the remains of another ceremonial structure four times larger, included the tantalising suggestion that it was aligned to the position of the sun on the shortest day of the year. This echoes a remarkable discovery published 20 years ago by the late Professor John North, an expert on the history of human cosmology.

In his book Stonehenge: Neolithic Man and the Cosmos, North showed by meticulous calculation how the alignment of Stonehenge was not, as was long supposed, to the Midsummer sunrise, but to its setting on the day of the Winter Solstice: in other words, to that very moment when the old year dies before nature begins its return to new life. For our Neolithic ancestors, it was thus a midwinter festival equivalent to our Christmas or the Roman Saturnalia.

We must now await further word from the academic discoverers of this new “Super-henge” on how they think its builders 4,500 years ago, like those of Stonehenge, directed it towards the position of the sun at just the moment when the year dies to be reborn. It was this which, when I first wrote about it on December 24 2006, inspired one of my sub-editors to the memorable headline “Have yourself a Megalithic Christmas”.

By  (Source – Telegraph)

Please view our Stonehenge Winter Solstice and Christmas Tours.

Stonehenge Guided Tours

A line of huge megaliths that once acted as a site for rituals carried out during the building of Stonehenge has been discovered. Here is how to visit the site

Why go

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a massive stone monument buried under the bank of a stone-age enclosure known as Durrington Walls, just two miles from Stonehenge.

A new line of stones has been found under Durrington Walls super-henge

A new line of stones has been found under Durrington Walls super-henge

Using powerful ground-penetrating radar, investigators from Birmingham and Bradford universities, alongside an international team of experts, have uncovered a 330m-long line of more than 50 massive stones, buried under part of the bank of Britain’s largest pre-historic henge.

Professor Vincent Gaffney, an archaeologist on the project, said that the discovery has significant implications for our understanding of Stonehenge and its landscape setting.

“Not only does this new evidence demonstrate a completely unexpected phase of monumental architecture at one of the greatest ceremonial sites in prehistoric Europe, the new stone row could well be contemporary with the famous Stonehenge sarsen circle or even earlier,” he said.

What is it

Gaffney said that the stones are thought to have been erected more than 4,500 years ago to form a dramatic ritual arena. The monuments were grand, built to give the impression of authority to the living and the dead.

However, as the megaliths are buried underground, visitors to the area will not be able to see them for themselves.

Yet you can still get a great sense of their majesty if you use a bit of imagination, and Durrington Walls, the village where Stonehenge’s builders lived, is itself an interesting site.

The henge at Durrington Walls has long mystified archaeologists because one side is straight while the rest of it is curved. It surrounds several smaller enclosures and timber circles, and is connected to a newly excavated later Neolithic settlement. Thousands of people travelled great distances to gather here and feast on roast pork and apples in midwinter. The area outside the ditch and bank was once a settlement, possibly housing hundreds of homes, making Durrington Walls the biggest village in north-west Europe at the time.

Durrington
The earliest phase of Durrington Walls with its line of megaliths

How to see the site on a guided walk

The National Trust is hosting a Discover Durrington Walls event on October 10. On this 3-mile walk, you’ll explore the secrets of Durrington Walls – once home to the builders of Stonehenge – and discover 6,000 years of hidden history with National Trust’s landscape guides.

To book: Call the estate office on 01980 664780 or email stonehenge@nationaltrust.org.uk

How to see the site on an independent walk

Download a National Trust map for one of the following routes and explore for yourself.

1. Ramble around on a Durrington Walls and Landscape walk and explore the connection between two of the most important henge enclosures in the country in a less-known part of the Stonehenge World Heritage Site. To view the route: nationaltrust.org.uk/wra-1356324449264/view-page/item463554/

2. Go on a Durrington Walls to Stonehenge walk and discover the landscape in its full glory from the Bronze Age barrow First World War military railway track, as well as its diverse wildlife and plants. To view the route: nationaltrust.org.uk/stonehenge-landscape/things-to-see-and-do/view-page/item937063/

Join a guided tour from London or Salisbury

Stonehenge Guided Tours operate daily tours of Stonehenge and many of their small group tours explore the greater landscape including Woodhenge and Durrington Walls.  Exclusive private guided tours can be arranged for individuals, families and small groups with local experts.  They also specialise in Stonehenge special access tours.  To view their tours: http://www.StonehengeTours.com

Local facilities

– Picnic area (not NT) and information panel at Woodhenge car park

– WCs

– Outdoor café

– Picnic area (not NT) at Stonehenge car park, 0.75 miles from this walking route.

How to get there

Bike: National Cycle Network route 45 runs south-east of the property. See sustrans.org.uk

Bus: Wilts & Dorset 5 or 6, between Salisbury, Pewsey, Marlborough and Swindon. Service 16 from Amesbury, request stop at Woodhenge

Rail: Salisbury station, 9 miles from Woodhenge car park

Road: Woodhenge car park is 1¾ miles north of Amesbury, follow signs from A345

This article was written by Trisha Andres (Telegraph Mail)

Stonehenge Guided Tours
The Stonehenge Experts
Touring Stonehenge since 1995

10-day exploration of ancient sites from Stonehenge to the Aran Islands.

Across the lush landscapes of England and Ireland lie some of the most important and intriguing prehistoric monuments in the world. In the company of local archaeologists, authors, and historians, uncover the stories of Neolithic and Bronze Age civilizations—and the mysteries of their legacies—as we make our way from Stonehenge to Ireland’s Bend of the Boyne, the Aran Islands, and more. –

National Geographic Trip Highlights

Take an insider’s tour of legendary Stonehenge and its adjacent sites with a local expert.
Explore the boglands of Céide Fields, a 6,000-year-old site excavated by archaeologist Seamus Caulfield.
Delve into the heritage of the Aran Islands with the director of the islands’ college.
Take a walking tour of the Burren National Park with a local author and discover Bronze Age sites amid this otherworldly limestone landscape.

This superb 10 Day Expedition Tour includes:

Avebury and Stonehenge (Day 3)
Step back thousands of years among remarkable megalithic monuments at the UNESCO World Heritage site of Avebury and Stonehenge. At Stonehenge close up
Avebury, stroll around the largest stone circle in the world, excavated in the early 20th century by archaeologist Alexander Keiller. Examine the site’s standing megaliths with a local expert, and examine artifacts found here at the Alexander Keiller Museum. Walk past Silbury Hill, Europe’s largest man-made, prehistoric mound, on the way to the Neolithic chambered tomb at West Kennet Long Barrow, which predates Stonehenge by some 400 years. Then head to legendary Stonehenge for an insider’s tour with local expert Pat Shelley. Visit the adjacent sites of Woodhenge and Durrington Walls, where the site’s builders are believed to have lived, and learn about recent discoveries that have shed light on the mysteries surrounding these sites. –

Learn about prehistoric civilizations with a seasoned archaeologist

2015 Tour departures:
June 06th – 15th
June 13th – 22nd
September 05th – 14th

Mysteries of Prehistoric England and Ireland Tour can be booked direct via the National Geographic Expedition Website

Stonehenge Guided Tours
http://www.StonehengeTours.com