October 2013


Gain a rare and fascinating insight into the famous World Heritage Site with an exclusive tour around the site led by two English Heritage experts.

We will start the tour with exclusive access to the stone circle at Stonehenge accompanied by our experts. 1-stonehenge-winterThen we will visit key archaeology sites including Durrington Walls, Woodhenge and The Cursus and learn more about the archaeological landscape and investigative work that has taken place in recent years.

Hot drinks and a breakfast roll will be served during the event.

This event has been graded as moderate access. There are many uneven paths and some slopes along the route. This event is not suitable for anyone under 16yrs.

How to Book

Tickets are available from 10am on Tuesday 22nd October by calling the dedicated ticket sales team on 0870 333 1183. (Mon-Fri 8.30am – 5.30pm, Sat 9am – 5pm

Link: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/events/1775100/
Link: http://www.stonehengetours.com/

Stonehenge Tour Guide

Philip Carr-Gomm's Weblog

The Ancient Paths: Discovering the Lost Map of Celtic Europe, review from ‘The Telegraph’
Tim Martin has his eyes opened by an enthralling new history that argues that Druids created a sophisticated ancient society to rival the Romans

Image
A 1570 map of Europe, from Abraham Ortelius’ atlas (detail) Photo: Alamy
By Tim Martin7:00AM BST 12 Oct 20137
‘Important if true” was the phrase that the 19th-century writer and historian Alexander Kinglake wanted to see engraved above church doors. It rings loud in the ears as one reads the latest book by Graham Robb, a biographer and historian of distinction whose new work, if everything in it proves to be correct, will blow apart two millennia of thinking about Iron Age Britain and Europe and put several scientific discoveries back by centuries.
Rigorously field-tested by its sceptical author, who observes drily that “anyone who writes about Druids and mysteriously coordinated landscapes…

View original post 1,502 more words

Stonehenge visitors will soon be able to trace the route along which people in prehistoric Britain made their way to the monument, when new visitor facilities open to the public.

From 18 December visitors will be able to walk along the newly completed Stonehenge Avenue, which will have been reconnected to the stone circle after being severed by the A344 road for centuries.

They will also be able to explore an exhibition of almost 300 prehistoric artefacts such as tools, jewellery and pottery.

Visitors will enjoy a 360-degree virtual, immersive experience, allowing them to ‘stand in the stones’, before they enter a gallery presenting the facts and theories surrounding Stonehenge through artefacts.

Many of the artefacts will be on show for the first time.

The permanent exhibition, curated by English Heritage experts, will be housed in a new visitor building located 1.5 miles to the west of Stonehenge.

The centre boasts indoor and outdoor seating for up to 260 people, a dedicated education space, and new, downloadable and hand-held free audio guides in 10 languages.

The £27m project also includes grassing over a section of the A344, which was closed permanently in June.

Simon Thurley, chief executive of English Heritage, said: “This world famous monument, perpetually described as a mystery, finally has a place in which to tell its story.

“The exhibition, created with imagination and rigour, will change the way people experience and think about Stonehenge forever – beyond the clichés and towards a meaningful inquiry into an extraordinary human achievement in the distant past.

“The exhibition will put at its centre the individuals associated with its creation and use, and I am very proud with what we have to unveil to the world in December.”

Stonehenge started as an early form of henge monument, built around 5,000 years ago, where prehistoric people buried their cremated dead.

It was built in several stages, with the lintelled stone circle being erected in the Neolithic period in around 2,500 BC.

Stonehenge remained important into the early Bronze Age (2,200–1,500 BC), when many burial mounds were built nearby.

Submitted by Emma McFarnon (http://www.historyextra.com/news/%E2%80%98missing-piece%E2%80%99-stonehenge-avenue-open-visitors-december)

Stonehenge Tours Guide