Wiltshire crop circles


Few can explain the mystery of crop circles, even fewer can explain the sheer volume that appear in rural Wiltshire- the crop circle capital of the UK!

Crop Circle Tours

Ours exclusive tours have permission to visit many of the Wiltshire Crop Circles. Led by local expert guides

These large inexplicable patterns that appear in fields have been rampant in the area since the 1960s- and are largely associated with UFOs- but what is the history of these perplexing configurations, where can they be found and how do experts believe they are formed?

Arcane geometric patterns.

Where can they be found?

Short answer, Wiltshire. The country has the highest rate of crop circles in the world! Wonderful field patterns pop up all over the county every year.  More specifically, the infamous ‘Warminster triangle’ has a large concentration of these crop circles within Wiltshire.

The dawn of Warminster circles infamy can be traced back to events that took place in 1964, when the ‘Warminster mystery’ took place- the UKs largest mass UFO spotting.

Arthur Shuttlewood recounts in The Warminster Mystery:

‘The air was brazenly filled with a menacing sound…

Sudden vibrations came overhead, chilling in intensity’

Ever since this spike in paranormal activity, crop circles have appeared in the area with formidable regularity- coincidence? The area of the ‘Warminster Triangle’ covers a large portion of Wiltshire and is a must visit for any crop circle enthusiasts.

Speaking of must visits for crop circle enthusiasts – The crop circle exhibition and information centre in Pewsey. The true hub for all the vital information about the history and science of crop circles in Wiltshire, located in the core of crop circle country, Honey Street Village. Here you can link up with fellow crop circle fanatics and discover more about crop circles from experts in ‘the field’. The centre contains fascinating photos of the previous year’s ‘crop’ of photos- and they can direct you to this season’s finest offerings.

“The multi-exhibition features the key facts of crop circle phenomenon and mixes it with stunning photography.”( http://www.cropcircleaccess.com/)

Cryptic rural engravings no one ever sees being formed.

What are the Stats?

Every year Wiltshire sees 30- 40 unique crop circles – which is, as I have mentioned, the highest rate of any area in the world. The circles tend to be around 60m across but can reach far greater sizes. For example, in 2001 at Milk Hill a 238m crop circle appeared overnight! It is impossible to predict where these circles will appear, what they look like and just how big they’re going to be.

What makes the crop circles?

And so, we reach the crucial questions – how are crop circles creates?

Unfortunately, there is no definitive answer- but there are several popular theories. The link between UFOs and crop circles seems to be the most popular explanation. Reports from farmers of strange lights in the sky usually accompany the arrival of a new crop circle, which would perhaps suggest alien interference from above. Next time you are examining a crop circle on the ground, perhaps you should look up.

Experts in the area of alien interference in crop circles have prospered an explanation named the ‘Plasma vortex phenomenon’. The theory has spawned from research at various crop circle sites where changes to the soil composition, changes in seed germination, and evidence of a brief flash of intense heat, have led to the suggestion that the cause is ‘spinning vortexes of microwave frequencies’.

Whether you think they are caused by UFOs, earth energies or anything else, you need to see these incredible geometric etchings first-hand – and Wiltshire is the centre of the crop circle universe. Join us this summer!

We are now taking bookings for our exclusive crop circle tours for the summer of 2020.  Small groups so book early.  We can also arrange extra dates (May – September) for private groups, ideal families and small groups.  Tours can depart from London, Salisbury or Bath

Ever wanted to learn about crop circles? Or wanted to meet crop circle enthusiasts to share thoughts with? Or find out about the latest news? If so, come to the Crop Circle Exhibition & Information Centre at the brand new Honeystreet Mill Café at Honeystreet, near Alton Barnes in the Vale… We visit this exhibition on our tours
Crop Circle Exhibition & Information Centre: Click here 

BOOK CROP CIRCLE TOURS HERE

The Stonehenge and Wiltshire Crop Circle Experts
Established 1995
www.StonengeTours.com

The first crop circle of 2013 has appeared in Wiltshire between Stonehenge and Avebury Stone Circle.  Click here to view the image and location.

Crop-circle-at-wiltsWiltshire is well known for its crop circles and much mystery still remains as to why they occur and the meanings behind their complex formations.

Crop circles in Wiltshire often occur around the heart of the county in and around Avebury, usually first appearing in April and continuing into the summer months. The Wiltshire Crop Circle Study Group established in 1995 to help the crop circle phenomena in all aspects. Within their website, the latest Wiltshire crop circles are published.

Crop circle code of conduct

Visitors are requested:

  • To seek permission from landowners at all times before entering private property.
  • To always use gates or stiles to enter fields – please do not climb over fences.
  • To close gates after passing through them.
  • Not to take vehicles into fields and ensure vehicles do not block landowners access points.
  • Where possible use ‘tramlines’ (where farmers’ tractors have cleared a path) to enter crop circles, so causing as little damage as possible to standing crops.

http://www.visitwiltshire.co.uk/ideas-and-inspiration/crop-circles
http://www.cropcircleconnector.com/2013/June2013.html
http://stonehengetours.com/weird-wiltshire-stonehenge-crop-circle-tour.htm

Explore thousands of years of mystic, historic happenings and ye olde English eccentricity

Simon Heptinstall from London’s TNT Travel Magazine visits Wiltshire.

Wiltshire is surely an epicentre of oddities. From inexplicable crop circles to mysterious prehistoric sites, this quintessential slice of unspoiled England is one of the most baffling and interesting places on the planet.

Photos: David Williams, Keith Chaloner/Visit Wiltshire, Britainonview, Getty  Read more: Weird Wiltshire: From mystical Stonehenge to crop cricles and ancient burial sites - TNT Magazine  Follow us: @tntmagazine on Twitter | tntmag on Facebook

Photos: David Williams, Keith Chaloner/Visit Wiltshire, Britainonview, Getty

I’m intrigued by the countless tall tales I’ve heard, and decide the best place to start a tour of weird Wiltshire has got to be Stonehenge.

Theories abound as to how the massive stones – some weighing as much as 50 tonnes – came to be arranged in ancient times. Were they gifts from extraterrestrial beings?

Magically transported through a wave of Merlin’s wizardly wand in the times of King Arthur?

Or simply heaved into place by tough primeval men, for use as an astrological calendar?

However the circle was formed, these mammoth rocks standing on an empty hilltop like the discarded stone lego of giants, are still one of the most imposing sights I’ve ever clapped eyes on

A £7.80 ticket buys you access to the perimeter of the stones, but rather than stump up that cash, I find a signposted National Trust walk, which loops around the surrounding fields.

From here I can still see the famous stone circle and also get a satisfying sense of its place in the ancient landscape of avenues and fields.

A short drive from Stonehenge, through rolling chalky hills, takes me to its lesser-known Stone Age neighbour, Avebury, one of the biggest prehistoric sites in Europe.

Photos: David Williams, Keith Chaloner/Visit Wiltshire, Britainonview, Getty

Photos: David Williams, Keith Chaloner/Visit Wiltshire, Britainonview, Getty

Its sprawling inner and outer stone circles were formed for some long-forgotten purpose, and are connected to the nearby town via a grassy ‘avenue’. This is marked by pairs of large grey stones and leads past ramparts, ditches and tombs.

Naturally, such a mystical scene attracts all the nutters, and I pass groups of beardy druid-types hanging around the various rocks, muttering what sound like charms or spells to themselves.

One old hippy tells me a local legend: if you press your ear to a stone you can hear voices from the past.

I test his theory and strain to catch a whisper from anyone, a Pagan god perhaps, or just a long-deceased worshipper, but eventually give up – his hearing must be better than mine.

Avebury is a real hotbed of quirky old sites.

A short walk away is Silbury Hill – a chalk lump of 40m high, it’s the tallest man-made mound in Europe, comparable in size and age to some Egyptian pyramids.

Its purpose is again unknown – there’s a definite trend here – but legend has it there’s a man on horseback and covered in gold buried in its heart.

Archaeologists have been tunnelling into the mound for years, though, and haven’t found anything yet.

From one burial site to another, the next place on my list to explore is West Kennet Long Barrow – an underground chambered Neolithic tomb

West Kennet Long Barrow

Photos: David Williams, Keith Chaloner/Visit Wiltshire, Britainonview, Getty

Constructed around 3650BC, this atmospheric chamber was in use for at least 1000 years, until it was sealed with chalk rubble and boulders.

Some archaeologists believe this happened at the same time the stone circles at Avebury were built, indicating a dramatic change in beliefs or religion.

Deep inside the chamber, I can’t resist letting out a ghostly “woooh”, which echoes around the old stones.

I’m quickly shushed by a serious-looking spiritualist kneeling on the ground nearby. Time to call it a day.

The next morning I check out Wiltshire’s eight white horses, landmark figures carved into the side of chalk hills. No mystery here though, they were formed by eccentric landowners just a few hundred years ago.

One of the most spectacular, at Cherhill, was designed in 1780 by Dr Christopher Alsop, known as ‘the mad doctor’, who shouted directions to its makers through a megaphone from the bottom of the hill.

Finally, I clamber to the top of Westbury Hill to get a view of the intricate crop circles in the fields below.

From geometric patterns to swirling circles, some of these appeared as recently as last month, yet as little is known about their origin as about Stonehenge’s.

One thing is clear though – Wiltshire shows no signs of getting any less weird over time.

Eat, sleep, drink

For top-notch veggie fare, head to the Circle Restaurant (High St, Marlborough, tel.             01672 539514      ). Sandwiches, soups and cream teas are the order of the day. Mains from about £5.

The Red Lion is a classic old thatched country pub within Avebury’s stone circle.

The pub grub is affordable with main courses from £8.89.

For one of the best selections of real ale in the county, visit The Inn With The Well, a pub with plenty of character. Pints from £3.15.

Quaint Tudor wood panelling and roaring fires set the scene at The Sun Inn, where pints start from about £3.

Avebury Life is a budget B&B embracing Wiltshire eccentricity. It advertises to those coming to “experience the strength and energy of the stones” or “connect with the crop circles”. Double room with en suite from £70pn.

Stay in a grand farmhouse a short drive from Avebury at Blounts Court Farm near Devizes. From £35pppn, it’s a bargain.

Getting there

Take the train from London Paddington to Swindon from £46.30 return. Then take the number 49 bus from Swindon to Avebury (doesn’t run on Sundays).

Links:
http://stonehengetours.com/weird-wiltshire-stonehenge-crop-circle-tour.htm (Weird Wiltshire Tour 2012)
http://www.weirdwiltshire.co.uk/
http://www.tntmagazine.com
http://blog.stonehenge-stone-circle.co.uk
thetrainline.com
english-heritage.org.uk

Needless to say we operate dily tours from London visiting all the locations mentioned. – www.StonehengeTours.com

Stonehenge Guided Tours

A crop circle formation about 700ft long with a snake-like pattern has appeared in a field in Wiltshire.

Experts said the formation in Milk Hill represents the transit of the planet Venus across the sun, an astronomical event that started last week.wiltshire-crop-circle

Crop circle researcher Michael Glickman said: “It’s wonderful and enigmatic and I’m convinced it is not man-made.

“There are too many of these which are of such great quality for them to be dismissed as made by humans.”

Microlight pilot and crop circle enthusiast Matthew Williams, who photographed the formation, disagrees and said he believes it was created by people who have improved their crop-circle-making skills.

He said: “Usually in the season, things develop from basic circles in the beginning to being much more complicated later on.

“I would say this formation is a case of people getting up their skills. There are a lot of people out there who make them.

“It’s a peculiar design and I think it’s the best out there this year.”

Source link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-18626542

If you are in the Stonehenge area on tour or independantly be sure to visit this amazing crop circle

The Stonehenge Tour Companyhttp://www.StonehengeTours.com