stonehenge guide


Stonehenge inner circle tour

Stonehenge inner circle tour

Heading to London this summer?  Yeah, so is everyone else. This week, Jaunted’s London embed, Lilit Marcus, will share some definite destinations for getting out of town and out of the crowds.
If you can make it through a visit to Stonehenge without making a Spinal Tap joke, you’re a better person than I am. The stone formation, built by Druids during the Bronze Age, is still one of the world’s great wonders as well as a UNESCO World Heritage site. That said, it’s also kind of in the middle of nowhere. Though there are plans to build a more convenient rail route out to Stonehenge, currently the only way to get there is by car. There are several tour companies who will take you there and back from London and it’s also quite common to combine this with a trip to Bath, which is the route I took.

Because most of us have seen pop culture references to Stonehenge, the expectation is that the mysterious rocks are huge and majestic. It’s not huge, but it’s definitely still majestic. The series of stones was believed to be a burial ground (human bones have been found there) but there are plenty of other theories, namely that the location of the stones helped to determine the calendar because of the way the light fell during different times of the year.

You can’t get up close to the stones anymore(thanks, all those people who thought it was cool to try and carve your initials into the side), but there’s plenty of beautiful countryside around the site and plenty of opportunities for unobstructed photos. There’s a very good audio tour included with the price of admission, and history buffs will like the opportunity to listen to extra sections or get additional information on their favorite topics. (Also, literature majors will appreciate the shoutout to Tess of the D’Urbervilles, which has a scene set at Stonehenge.)

Once you’ve fully circled the formation and gotten the necessary Facebook photos in front of the Heel Stone, there’s not much else to do but check out the gift shop and cafes.The shop includes specific Stonehenge gear like books, magnets, and even lollipops (they’re blackurrant flavored), as well as Englishy treats like knit blankets and boxes of tea. Getting a history rundown and a stuffed Wilshire sheep in one quick jaunt seems like a pretty good deal, and you can be back in London before dinnertime.

Article source: http://www.jaunted.com

It is still possilbe to get inside the Stones if you book one of our exclusive Stonehenge private access tours:
http://www.StonehengeTours.com

The Stonehenge Tour Company

Stonehenge has confounded archaeologists and academics alike since its early beginnings

Einstein once declared that ‘the most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious’, and this statement is particularly fitting as regards Stonehenge. It was declared a World Heritage Site in 1986 and retains its intensely spiritual and otherworldly ambience, despite the number of tourists it attracts. If you choose to visit this extraordinary site, ensure you also spend some time delving into the captivating areas that surround Stonehenge. Explore picturesque Windsor and beguiling Bath.

Modern archaeological techniques and a number of recent digs have helped to form new theories about the stones that constitute Stonehenge. However, their definitive use stays as enigmatic as ever; it is suffused with a continuing sense of mystery. Stonehenge stands as an authoritative witness to the once extraordinary civilisations of the Stone and Bronze Ages of around 3,700 BC to 1,600 BC. Similarly, its surrounding areas stand as testament to these mighty cultures.

There is no place on earth quite like Stonehenge. Its brooding, pervasive mysticism, its intense spirituality and its endless aura of mystery all combine to make it an inimitable, idiosyncratic landmark. Take a Stonehenge tour and discover just why it continues to fascinate and perplex people from all over the world.

You may not know that Stonehenge is not the only ancient site in this region. Yet, in fact, a mere 25 miles north of Stonehenge is the impressive Avebury complex, which is a robust contender to be the most grandiose of all the residual prehistoric earthworks in Europe. The Avebury stone circle is actually much greater than that of Stonehenge – but the stones are smaller. A strong benefit that comes of visiting Avebury is that you can in fact touch its stones. Woodhenge, which consists of a circle of wooden posts, is an even more obscure and oft overlooked landmark.

Theories as to the use of Stonehenge range from the eminently believable to the absurd. In the twentieth century, both Fred Hoyle and Gerald Hawkins fascinatingly argued that not only was Stonehenge used as an observatory, but also to calculate future astronomical events such as eclipses. Yet it is probably von Däniken’s theory about Stonehenge that has led to the most furore, conflict and general disputation. Däniken claims that either extraterrestrials, or humans who were aided by extraterrestrials, built Stonehenge. He then goes on to argue that Stonehenge is an exact replica of our solar system, including the asteroid belt.

Why not merge a visit to Stonehenge with visits to its nearby districts, which hold their own captivating and idiosyncratic attractions? A combination Bath and Stonehenge tour from London is one of the most extraordinary tours you can do. Bath is, without a doubt, one of the most absorbing destinations to explore in the UK. An especially great number of visitors assemble to view the extraordinary sunrise at the summer solstice.

Link: http://pressitt.com/smnr/Stonehenge-A-Sacred-Burial-Site/10709/

The Stonehenge Tour Company
http://www.StonehengeTours.com

Get Up Close To The Stones At Stonehenge Like Few Visitors Do

Stonehenge Sunset

Stonehenge Sunset Tour

Built nearly 5,000 years ago, Stonehenge is the most popular prehistoric monument in the world. Most visitors to the site are not allowed direct access to the stones.

On this tour you get that access, with a private viewing of the mysterious monoliths. We will enter the stone circle itself and stand beside the mighty Sarsen rocks towering above us.
Our guide will explain the history of this ancient site, pointing out the altar, slaughter and heel stones, above which the sun rises dramatically on the summer solstice. There will be time to enjoy the peace, away from the crowds, as we experience Stonehenge at its most mystical and atmospheric best. Not to be missed!

With special access you are allowed right inside Stonehenge, walking among the stones close up and with a maximum of 26 people on the whole site.

After collection from London in the morning we drive to Bath to visit the Roman Baths and Pump Room. In the late afternoon we visit Lacock for an early evening supper in a 13th century inn, before driving to Stonehenge.

As the sun begins to set, we enter the stone circle (which is normally roped off to the public) for a unique private viewing. The most dramatic and atmospheric way of visiting Stonehenge.

On selected days the tour operates in reverse, beginning with a private viewing of Stonehenge before it opens to the public in the morning, so we see the stones in the eerie morning light. This is followed by our visits to Lacock and Bath.

These tours sell out very quickly as the demand far outstrips supply of available places – be sure to reserve your place early.

The tour twins your special visit to Stonehenge with Bath and Lacock.

Lacock

Lacock is a very picturesque village dating back to the Saxon era. So pretty is the village that it has provided the setting for many movies and television dramas including Jane Austens Pride and Prejudice and more recently Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. Take a walk before enjoying an early evening supper* (breakfast for morning tours*) in The George, a vintage English pub built in 1361. (*food/drink not included).

Bath

Bath, a world heritage site, is a beautiful Georgian city with delightful crescents, terraces and architecture. There will be plenty of time to visit Bath Abbey, or to shop and explore. Your guide will also conduct an optional walking tour to show you where Charles Dickens lived and worked as a young man, and a give you a chance to sample some delicious cheeses fresh from the local dairy farms. Then we will enter the magnificent Roman Baths, where over one million litres of boiling water still burst free from the hot springs everyday.

Stonehenge Special Access Tours Dates 2012

MORNING Dates

January 2012
13,20,23,30

February 2012
3,13,17

March 2012
2,5,12,16

April 2012
5,9,12,19,23,26

May 2012
3,10,14,17,24,28,31

June 2012
4,7,11,14

July 2012
5,16,19,23,26

August 2012
2,9,13,16,23,27,30

September 2012
2,9,13,16,23,27,30

EVENING Dates

April 2012
1,4,8,15,18,22,29

May 2012
6,9,13,23,27

June 2012
3,6,10,13

July 2012
1,4,8,22,25,29

August 2012
5,8,12,19,22,26

September 2012
2,9,16

Link source

 Visit our website: http://www.StonehengeTours.com
The Stonhenge Tour Company

Don’t miss this opportunity to walk within the stones of Stonehenge before any visitors arrive, to venture into the religious landscapes of two of Britain’s most spectacular prehistoric sites and to have the latest ideas and archaeological discoveries described and put into the context of the monumental remains.  Based within the Cathedral Close in Salisbury
Stonehneg inner circle tour - close up

Day one

 Meet in the evening for an introductory lecture and dinner together in Sarum College in the beautiful Cathedral Close.

Day two

By coach to Avebury for a full exploration of the huge Neolithic henge, so large that part of the village lies within it. It is one of the largest and best preserved of 1300 stone circles known in the British Isles. Morning walk around the henge and along the ceremonial Avenue. We approach the stones of Avebury just as one would have done in prehistoric times.

Afternoon circular walk (2 hours) past Silbury Hill, the largest man-made mound in Europe. The most famous of its excavators crawled into an earlier excavation chamber and recorded later:

“the sides of the open chamber provided one of the most astonishing sights that I have ever seen…it was clear that this innermost mound had been covered by a series of conical shells or cappings…the effect was of finding oneself in an enormously complicated and highly coloured layer cake of gigantic size..”

The walk continues to the Long Barrow at West Kennet and a chance to explore the chambered tomb within. This kind of monument is the earliest known to have been built in Britain – in commemoration of the dead. Continue to the ‘Sanctuary’, a small, complex timber and stone circle on the top of Overton hill. Walking in our ancestors’ footsteps helps us try to understand their motives and methods. Disperse in Salisbury about 5.30pm.

Day three

Stonehenge for an early (7.30am) visit inside the stone circle before the public arrives. This will be followed by a walk (2 hours) through the wider religious landscape – the cursus, King Barrows and Stonehenge Avenue.

A short drive takes us to Woodhenge, where the remains of wooden post settings have been found – now marked by concrete. From here there is a good view over the huge henge at Durrington Walls, site of exciting recent excavations which revealed the settlement which may have housed the builders of Stonehenge.

Return to Salisbury Museum for a visit to the Stonehenge and Prehistory Galleries. We have arranged a private demonstration of flint-knapping in the gardens here, which is not only much enjoyed, but adds considerably to your understanding of the way in which our prehistoric forebears were able to fashion all manner of implements and tools from our good local flint supplies. In a world without metal technology this was a critical and highly sophisticated art. Disperse about 5pm.

Should you choose to arrive earlier or stay later, you might like to visit Old Sarum, the hillfort to the north of Salisbury which was later chosen as the site of our first cathedral, and of course our beautiful Gothic cathedral – straight in front of the College.

Fri 31st August – Sun 2nd September 2012
Link: http://www.barebonestours.co.uk/Europe/bare-bones-wessex-2011.html

More Stonehenge Tours: ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company
‘ – www.StonehengeTours.com

Tours from Antiquity offers a unique opportunity to explore the awe inspiring world famous Stonehenge and Avebury Prehistoric Landscapes with an expert service, guided by a qualified archaeologist.  This exclusive tour can be booked through ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company

West Kennet Long Barrow

West Kennet Long Barrow

The tour includes –

  • Return travel from London in a luxury coach 
  • Entrance in to Stonehenge
  • Visit Stonehenge Cursus, Stonehenge Avenue and several Bronze Age Round Barrows (burial mounds)  (only runs between March and October, due to time restrictions in the winter months)
  • A visit to one of the world’s most beautiful cities, Bath. Nourished by natural hot springs, stunning architecture, great shopping and iconic attractions
  • Guided coach tour around some of the most beautiful and stunning architectural works in Bath
  • Visit Woodhenge and Durrington Walls
  • Visit West Kennet Long Barrow and Silbury Hill
  • Visit Avebury Stone Circle and Henge 

You will enjoy the passion and enthusiasm expressed by our professional,  archaeologist tour leaders.

Why choose Tours From Antiquity?

  • Tours From Antiquity conduct ONLY Archaeology Tours, and as a result we believe we offer an excellent up-to-date specialist service; giving you the opportunity to learn in great detail about these amazing prehistoric sites, but also leaving you time to explore your surroundings by yourself.
  • Tours From Antiquity is owned by qualified archaeologists and our tour leaders are all qualified archaeologists, offering the most professional service possible.
  • On our tours you will be travelling with no more than 19 other people – guaranteed. With smaller group sizes comes a more personalised excursion experience.
  • Our tour coaches offer luxury transport, with good air circulation and clear PA system.

Our itineraries are carefully planned offering the very best experience while you discover as much as possible.

 

Tours From Antiquity was set up in order to tackle the growing interest and demand in the historic environment in the United Kingdom. Identified was a niche for specialist, qualified archaeology tours to the exceptional and world famous archaeological sites of Stonehenge and Avebury prehistoric landscapes. We aim to concentrate on small group sizes unlike the larger tour companies, creating an intimate feel to thetour.

Tours From Antiquity aims to guide you around all these fantastic archaeology sites, maximising your enjoyment and experience, answering all queries, be it general or academic whilst conducting a brilliantly informative archaeology tour. As well as a qualified archeologist tour leader, Tours From Antiquity offer luxury coach travel, admission to English Heritage sites and ‘free time’ for our customers to enjoy and explore the world’s most beautiful cities, Bath. Nourished by natural hot springs, stunning architecture, great shopping and iconic attractions

Tours From Antiquity offer lecture standard archaeology tours, embracing the entire landscape in which these famous sites are situated. Offering a guided archaeology tour through the biographies of these landscapes allows our customers a rare opportunity to truly understand the motives and beliefs of the architects and creators of prehistoric Britain.

Tours From Antiquity firmly believe that through providing passionate tour leaders who have devoted their careers to the study and public presentation of archaeology offers our customers a truly unique and exceptional experience.

 This exclusive tour can be booked with ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’ http://www.StonehengeTours.com

 Stonehenge is a fascinating edifice to attempt to decode, and new theories are constantly arising regarding its origins and function.

Take a Stonehenge tour and delve into its mysteries: you are likely to be confounded by this imperious landmark.

 A great number of legends connected to Stonehenge have ranged in their assertions from stating that its construction originated fromStonehenge tour Ireland to those even claiming it began in Africa. It has even been maintained that wizards and giants had something to do with the building of this enigmatic structure.

 Yet all the evidence flies in the face of such high-flown assertions. The stones were engraved approximately around 3,000 BC. The positioning of the stones, conversely, dates back to 2,200 BC. Therefore, it is obvious that the creation of Stonehenge was not an instant phenomenal accomplishment. This wholly destabilises claims that the stones were positioned by giants or wizards, as it is obvious that it took much time, indeed, thousands of years, to form Stonehenge.

 Fairly recently, scientists, using the most modern technology available to them, have managed to go further back in time than before to the history of Stonehenge. They have contended that they have, as a result of this, made significant new discoveries about the enigmatic landmark. They have argued that the monument was already a very ancient ritualistic hub when the stones were raised over 5,000 years ago.

 Indeed, it is believed that by the time the primary megaliths of Stonehenge were elevated, it had already become a place of ritual import to the local populace. One theory is that, before the megaliths were added, Stonehenge in fact functioned as a cremation cemetery; hundreds of bodies were buried there. That seems to suggest that the ceremonial rituals, rather chillingly, may have involved deaths in the form of sacrifices.

 Another theory is that Stonehenge also might have been a site for sun worship a great deal of time before the legendary stones were put up over 5,000 years ago.

 Back in the 12th century, Henry of Huntingdon asserted of Stonehenge: ‘no one has been able to discover by what mechanism such vast masses of stone were elevated, nor for what purpose they were designed’.  The truly concrete facts behind the creation of Stonehenge are arguably as intangible, as difficult to assert as ever.

 Up to the modern age, the Stonehenge circle and earthworks are associated with—and employed by—many groups that claim there is a particular supernatural or divine significance to the landmark. Many do argue that some kind of unearthly authority is in attendance at Stonehenge, and this can be taken and channeled.

 Visit Stonehenge and become awed by the ineffable atmosphere that emanates from this grand landmark. Stonehenge is an exquisite monument, a momentous edifice that deserves your full scrutiny. Bask in the unique aura around this, some would say, otherworldly structure. Stonehenge tours offer an altogether different experience from any other tour.

The Stonehenge Tour Company
www.StonehengeTours.com

 Explore the renowned World Heritage Site and discover for yourself why Stonehenge has provoked such immense debate. You could never grow tired of trying to clarify its countless uncertainties. A Stonehenge special access tour makes for an especially exquisite tour experience. Or maybe go for a Stonehenge tour, for example, a Stonehenge morning tour, and marvel at this overwhelming landmark.

Mentions of Stonehenge come up again and again in the writings of great scholars, dating right back to the Middle Ages. Roman artefacts and coins have been unearthed there, and, more alarmingly, in 1923 Saxon remains of a headless man were discovered at Stonehenge.

Stonehenge is, well and truly, a compelling nominee for the title of the most legendary landmark on the planet: it cannot be compared to any other. It does not fail to equally fascinate and charm visitors from all over the planet.

Three extremely absorbing theories about imperious Stonehenge are:

The Legend of Merlin
The legend goes that Merlin moved the stones to Salisbury Plain from Ireland after the Saxon leader, Hengest, had treacherously slain 300 British noblemen. Aurelius Ambrosius, the high king, wanted to create an apposite commemorative landmark for the massacred men. Merlin suggested that the Giant’s Ring stone circle in Ireland be moved to Britain and become the commemorative landmark: this, in turn, became Stonehenge.

Edward Duke
Edward Duke was the first person to attempt to find a connection between Stonehenge and astronomy, and asserted that Stonehenge itself was in fact a planetarium and possessed important astronomical patterns. He also stated that specific stones seemed to line up with the midsummer sunrise and midwinter sunset.

Erich von Däniken
Däniken claims that either extraterrestrials, or humans who were guided by extraterrestrials, made Stonehenge. As well as this, he argues that Stonehenge is a an exact duplicate of our solar system, true to scale, including the asteroid belt. 
It is probably von Däniken’s theory about Stonehenge has inflamed the most discussion in the modern age.

Which theory do you find most convincing, most believable? Or do you rebuff all three of these theories? They are, after all, amongst the most atypical and uncanny. A London Tour to Stonehenge could illuminate things for you; a visit to the amazing structure itself could aid you in coming to your own decision as to why Stonehenge was built.

Stonehenge persists in captivating hundreds of thousands of visitors per year. Particularly vast crowds assemble to see the sunrise on the summer solstice. Theories as to the original function of Stonehenge are still rife.

Stonehenge has puzzled intellectuals and archaeologists down the eras. Become delighted by the mystical atmosphere that permeates this landmark on a Stonehenge tour.

The Stonehenge Tour Company – www.StonehengeTours.com

 

Thirteen kilometres north of Salisbury at the A303 roundabout, I motor west and 1.6 kilometres past the roundabout, there it is — looming in all its gargantuan glory for us to try to apprehend on a typically overcast afternoon in England.
Stonehenge Stone Circle, Wiltshire

The same country that produced the Rolling Stones provides us with stones of a much more stable nature, fixed in place for centuries; albeit these stones were actually moved some distance. Stonehenge, a 5,000-year-old stone circle puzzle, is the most famous prehistoric site in Europe. I park the car, amazed at how this mammoth entity suddenly manifests itself amidst the English plain.

And for what purpose?

Theories include an astronomical observatory, religious site, burial locale and a healing centre akin to that of Lourdes. Unfortunately, Stonehenge was created by those who left no written records; thus, many aspects remain subject to debate. Whatever its purpose, the precise design does include an observatory function. The two inner horseshoes are aligned along the rising and setting of the sun at the midsummer and midwinter solstices. Accordingly, the configuration allows for accurate predictions of eclipse, solstice, equinox and other celestial events.

These granite stones, some of which weigh as much as four tons, were reportedly dragged all the way from Marlborough Downs (North Wessex) and South Wales, 400 kilometres away! Erected in pairs, each is topped by an equally huge stone lintel. Within the inner circles stand two horseshoe-shaped arrangements, one within the other, and at the centre lies what is known as the Altar Stone. Further stones are to be found here and there within the site, which is surrounded by barrow mounds.

Years earlier, there was relatively easy access to the site, but that has changed. The stones can still be seen from the main car park, and can be viewed quite clearly from the roadside. Unlike the other monuments in the area, however, it’s necessary now to pay for an up close look. An entry fee of £7.50 for adults and £4.50 for children includes an audio guide and takes you through a tunnel under the road to the site. Generally, there is no direct access to the stone circle itself; visitors are guided around the monument by roped pathways and on-site attendants. The audio guide is available in several languages and lasts approximately 45 minutes. English Heritage and some tour operators from Salisbury can arrange early morning or evening visits that allow you to walk amidst the stones.

There are also daily tours of Stonehenge from London by coach.
Visit our website: http://www.StonehengeTours.com

From about 2500 B.C., Neolithic and Bronze Age man started to amass the Bluestones and Sarsen stones from Wales and the Marlborough Downs. It was not until 1600 BC that the complete structure of Stonehenge was finished. Most of the other monuments in the area, such as Durrington Walls and Woodhenge, date from the same period.

If you go

If you wish to play amateur Druid and check out Stonehenge during an actual solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, the longest day and shortest night of the year occur at the beginning of summer around June 20 or 21 when the sun is directly overhead at noon at the Tropic of Cancer. At winter solstice, about Dec. 22, the sun is overhead at noon at the Tropic of Capricorn and this marks the beginning of winter.

A nearby hill fort was built during the Iron Age, and there is evidence to suggest that the area was extensively settled by the Romans. The nearby town of Amesbury was later settled during the Saxon reign in 979 AD.

If you enjoy books the size and scope of War and Peace, to better understand Stonehenge try reading Sarum, historical fiction by Edward Rutherfurd which I have almost finished. Sarum, in the southwestern part of England, is the location of the ancient cathedral city, Salisbury, and a close neighbour of Stonehenge. Rutherfurd was born there, so he knows the place well, and in his first novel, he delves into Sarum’s pre-history to follow five families through the centuries in epic style reminiscent of James Michener.

Stonehenge is a World Heritage site. I’m not given to Druid superstitions and strange dreams about ritual sacrifice, but it gives me a weird sensation each time that I see it.

Mike Keenan is a Niagara-on- the-Lake based writer. Contact him at www.whattravelwriterssay.com

The Stonehenge Tour Company – Operating guided tours of Stonehenge since 1995
The Stonehenge Tour Company – www.StonehengeTours.com

Though the Druids undoubtedly existed, their place in our history is now

Druids at Stonehenge

Druids at Stonehenge

more legendary than factual, as so few records or artefacts exist to throw light on who they were and what they did. The Romans , who regarded them as enemies of the Roman state and who were horrified by the human sacrifices supposedly made by the Druids, attempted to wipe them out. The Christians too attacked them for their obviously non-Christian beliefs – one of the few things we can be truly sure about the Druids is that they held certain oak and hazel groves sacred, as both Romans and Christians were at pains to chop them down and burn the wood.

From the Roman and Greek sources, however, we can be fairly sure of a few basic facts about the Druids and their place in Celtic life (across Gaul and beyond as well as in Britain).

First and foremost they were a class, although not a hereditary class but one open to those of ability willing to undergo a long training period – perhaps as long as 20 years. They formed a learned class within the Celtic people, a mixture of judge, scholar, counsellor, doctor, diplomat and priest in one. Part of their demise has been put down by some writers as due to the antipathy of tribal chiefs and regional kings whose power would be lessened by the influence of Druids, said to have the right to speak before them in tribal gatherings, and able to intervene in and stop conflicts of which they did not approve.
It seems that as well as oak and hazel, mistletoe played a part in their worship practises, as did reverence for sacred sites such as hills and rivers, and fire. Theirs was a polytheistic religion. From the Romans we can be fairly sure they used sacrifice in their worship, and possibly in divination, these sacrifices being both animal and human – tales of blood gushing from hearts stabbed with sacred daggers if not strictly true still make interesting reading.

The training of a Druid was lengthy, and in all likelihood carried out away from prying eyes, or more significantly eavesdropping ears – much of it was concerned with learning sacred verses by heart.

Although some aspects of Druidism may have survived into medieval times and even beyond – the bardic culture of Wales is surely linked in some ways – as a power they were to a great extent finished by the Roman attack on Anglesey in AD61 (an attack that Boudicca took advantage of, rebelling in the East while the Romans were engaged in Wales).

Modern Druidism is a mixture of surmise, romantic imagination, and the gathered misconceptions of writers from recent centuries, a creative version of something about which few facts remain, or more kindly a sincere religious faith to which the perhaps ill-fitting label Druidism has been attached. This ‘creativity’ is perhaps seen most clearly in the use of Stonehenge , which long predates Druidism, as a sacred site for some Neo-Druids.

Stonehenge Tour Guide
The Stonehenge Tour Company – www.StonehengeTours.com
(Operating tours of Stonehenge since 1995 – The original and still the best! )

 Are you searching for a truly unique sightseeing experience?

Stonehenge coach tours from London may be the answer to your every wish. An overwhelming divine aura permeates this incomparable monument. A world heritage site, Stonehenge is debatably the most vital archaic structure in the UK. Take a Stonehenge coach tour and uncover why it has acquired such renowned status, and just why it is that Stonehenge tours are so highly favoured over other tours from London.

Stonehenge  Guided Tours

Stonehenge Guided Tours

Decide between a Stonehenge morning tour or a Stonehenge evening tour with Golden Tours. For the genuinely astounding, indescribable experience, however, you may want to make the most of our elite Stonehenge special access tour. This imparts you with entry to the circle, so that you can get up close to the stones, for a Stonehenge tour with true distinction.

Without a doubt, Stonehenge holds the ability to beguile any visitor. It is an antiquarian structure, yet the details as to its construction remain unclear. 40 tons of rocks have stood on Salisbury Hill for just about 5,000 years. Was Stonehenge used as a religious temple or possibly even as a Bronze Age burial ground?

Theories thrive as to why it was built as well. Discover why it has provoked such debate: go on one of many Stonehenge tours from London.

Or for a comprehensive day out, go on a Stonehenge, Bath, Windsor tour, and discover all three of these charming places. Let Bath’s charming highlights reveal themselves to you: in any case, Bath abounds with captivating sites of culture and holds a rich history. Marvel at the grandiose Royal Crescent and the magnificent Pulteney Bridge. An especial highlight of fascinating Windsor is captivating Windsor Castle.

Bus tours from London to Stonehenge are incredibly prolific. Golden Tours offers a comprehensive range of packages that can fit the wishes of anyone wanting to experience the remarkable wonder that is Stonehenge for themselves. Golden Tours’ large number of tours range from the remarkable value ‘Simply Stonehenge’ tour to Stonehenge special access tours and Stonehenge, Bath, Windsor tours.

Stoneheneg Tour Company

 

 

The Stonehenge Tour Company
Operating Stonehenge Tours since 1995

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