stonehenge access


Buzz Aldrin, the second man to set foot on the moon, has sent a “message to the Red Planet” from Stonehenge.
(Buzz Aldrin was the second man to set foot on the surface of the moon, after Neil Armstrong, in July 1969)

English Heritage said a number of people had questioned whether the image had been doctored. Copyright James O, Davis

English Heritage said a number of people had questioned whether the image had been doctored. Copyright James O, Davis

The 85-year-old donned a T-shirt urging travel to Mars as he was snapped striking a Superman pose in front of the pre-historic monument.

Following his Wiltshire visit, he tweeted: “While at Stonehenge I decided to send a message to the cosmos.”

The veteran astronaut has called for renewed efforts to not only send a manned mission to Mars but colonize it.

Jessica Trethowan, from English Heritage, said there had been several enquiries about whether the image was real.

“Someone asked if it had been Photoshopped it, but it is real,” she said.

“It was a private visit for him and his family. We were told about it a week or so ago and everyone was very excited about meeting him.”

After a tour of the ancient site, the charity said Aldrin had asked “where we hide the aliens”.

Article Source: BBC – http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-wiltshire-31920141

Enjoy a Stonehenge private Access viewing like Buzz on one of our ‘Stonehenge inner circle access tours

Stonehenge Guided Tours
http://www.StonehengeTours.com

32-foot-tall stack of stones discovered

Stonehenge has some company in the department of mysterious stone structures: In a new paper, researchers are now revealing that an unusual rock formation was discovered via sonar in the Sea of Galilee a decade ago. Divers who have since gone down to inspect it say it’s a 32-foot-tall cone-shaped formation made of “unhewn basalt cobbles and boulders,” reports LiveScience, which describes it as a cairn—a stack of rocks piled on top of each other. Its diameter measures about 230 feet (double that of Stonehenge’s outer circle), and it’s estimated to weigh 60,000 tons.

Giant rock structure found under sea

Giant rock structure found under sea

Though the researchers admit they don’t know what the structure’s purpose was (LiveScience notes similar cairns have been used to mark graves), they have determined it was definitely made by humans, likely on land; a rising sea would have later submerged it. “The boulders have natural faces with no signs of cutting or chiseling,” researchers wrote in the International Journal of Nautical Archaeology. “Similarly, we did not find any sign of arrangement or walls that delineate this structure.” Up next: The team hopes to conduct an underwater archaeological expedition in order to mine for artifacts and pinpoint the age of the structure—which one researcher believes could date back more than 4,000 years.

 

 

Article by: By Ruth Brown,  Newser Staff
http://www.newser.com/story/165993/in-sea-of-galilee-a-mystery-bigger-than-stonehenge.html

Stonehenge News

MORE than 5,000 people turned out to greet the sun at Stonehenge on Friday morning.

Stonehenge Winter Solstice 2012

The weather held off for sunrise at the Winter Solstice celebrations and only one arrest was made for drunk and disorderly behaviour.

An English Heritage spokesman said: “This year the weather was particularly fine and the ancient stones were bathed in winter sunshine. The atmosphere throughout was good natured.

“English Heritage would like to thank everyone who helped organise this year’s celebrations.”

Source: http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk

Visitors were rewarded with a spectacular sunrise

 


Stonehenge Guided Tours – 

Today (September 30th) is the last day of the season for Stonehenge inner circle tours (see below)

Due to conservation reason English Heritage, quite rightly, do not allow people to enter the Stones before or after the monument is closed  to the public.  Private access resumes in December and throughout 2013.  These are very popular tours and demand far exceeds availability. They must be booked well in advance!Stonehenge private viewing

Stonehenge is open as usual during normal opening hours:

1 September – 15 October 2012 Daily 9.30 – 18.00 

16 October 2012 – 15 March 2013 Daily 9.30 – 16.00 

We continue operate daily tours of Stonehenge from London that include a regular visit to Stonehenge.  A regular visit allows you to get within 30 feet of the stones.

(Stone Circle Access visits take place outside the normal opening times at Stonehenge, and are very early in the morning or late in the evening, and are not offered during the normal opening times.)

What is meant by conservation?
Is it protecting the site, maintaining the site, enhancing the site or keeping it exactly as it is?
Conservation is the process of managing change to a significant place in its setting in ways that will best sustain its heritage values, while recognising opportunities to reveal or reinforce those values for present and future generations (Conservation Principles, Policies and Guidance for the sustainable management of the Historic Environment. English Heritage 2008). The Stonehenge World Heritage Site Management Plan 2009 is the main document which sets out the overarching strategy for protecting the Outstanding Universal Value of the property. Other agencies such as the National Trust and the RSPB also have similar plans

Link: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/education/resources/stonehenge/conservation-research/interview/
Link: http://www.pitchcare.com/magazine/managing-the-grass-areas-at-stonehenge.html
L
ink: http://www.stonehengetours.com

Stonehenge Guided Tours

Fire Garden at Stonehenge 11th / 12th July 2012   
A magical, sensory experience awaits you as Stonehenge is transformed into a glowing fairytale. Fire Garden Stonehenge Tour 2012
Exclusive Guided Tour from London operated by ‘The Stonehenge Tour Company’

As the sun goes down over one of Britain’s most iconic World Heritage sites, French outdoor alchemists Compagnie Carabosse fan the flames of our imaginations with an elemental Fire Garden.

A magical, sensory experience awaits you as Stonehenge is transformed into a glowing fairytale environment where fire sculptures dance in the landscape, mysterious fiery engines illuminate the stones and flaming fire pots and cascades of candles line the pathways.

“A unique opportunity to walk amongst the Stones* at sunset and enjoy this gloriously atmospheric feast for the senses.”
“A once in a lifetime opportunity”

Maria Bota, Festival Director said:

“We aim to inspire, entertain and make moments which transform people and spaces. Our thanks to the remarkable Compagnie Carabosse for their beautiful fire garden creations, to English Heritage, with whom we have worked for many years at Stonehenge, for their continued collaboration and to London 2012 for enabling us to bring this idea to flickering life.”

Carabosse have staged their striking installations across Europe. Each event is unique to its specific location, and here they ignite their creative spark to create a remarkable moment in the historic Wiltshire landscape.

PRACTICALITIES AND TIMINGS The guided walk to Stonehenge from the Fire Garden Car Park to the Fire Garden at Stonehenge is around 1 kilometre, about a 15 minute walk, through National Trust farmland. You will have a beautiful view before you of Stonehenge and the Fire Garden in the landscape. Sensible footwear is definitely advisable as the land is agricultural and the route includes some sloping ground.

*IMPORTANT Please do not climb, stand on or lean against the stones. This is in the interest of personal safety and protection of this special site. As well as putting the stones themselves at risk, climbing on them can damage the delicate lichens. This includes the stones that are fallen.

HighlightsFire Garden at Stonehenge
Stonehenge Stone Circle close up
Includes Entrance Fee
Luxury Midi Coach Travel Minimum 2 hours at Stonehenge
Stonehenge Expert Guide Services
Fire Garden Experience

Bookings and information: http://www.stonehengetours.com/stonehenge-fire-garden-tour-july-2012.htm

The Stonehenge Tour Company – www.StonehengeTours.com

Stonehenge has confounded archaeologists and academics alike since its early beginnings

Einstein once declared that ‘the most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious’, and this statement is particularly fitting as regards Stonehenge. It was declared a World Heritage Site in 1986 and retains its intensely spiritual and otherworldly ambience, despite the number of tourists it attracts. If you choose to visit this extraordinary site, ensure you also spend some time delving into the captivating areas that surround Stonehenge. Explore picturesque Windsor and beguiling Bath.

Modern archaeological techniques and a number of recent digs have helped to form new theories about the stones that constitute Stonehenge. However, their definitive use stays as enigmatic as ever; it is suffused with a continuing sense of mystery. Stonehenge stands as an authoritative witness to the once extraordinary civilisations of the Stone and Bronze Ages of around 3,700 BC to 1,600 BC. Similarly, its surrounding areas stand as testament to these mighty cultures.

There is no place on earth quite like Stonehenge. Its brooding, pervasive mysticism, its intense spirituality and its endless aura of mystery all combine to make it an inimitable, idiosyncratic landmark. Take a Stonehenge tour and discover just why it continues to fascinate and perplex people from all over the world.

You may not know that Stonehenge is not the only ancient site in this region. Yet, in fact, a mere 25 miles north of Stonehenge is the impressive Avebury complex, which is a robust contender to be the most grandiose of all the residual prehistoric earthworks in Europe. The Avebury stone circle is actually much greater than that of Stonehenge – but the stones are smaller. A strong benefit that comes of visiting Avebury is that you can in fact touch its stones. Woodhenge, which consists of a circle of wooden posts, is an even more obscure and oft overlooked landmark.

Theories as to the use of Stonehenge range from the eminently believable to the absurd. In the twentieth century, both Fred Hoyle and Gerald Hawkins fascinatingly argued that not only was Stonehenge used as an observatory, but also to calculate future astronomical events such as eclipses. Yet it is probably von Däniken’s theory about Stonehenge that has led to the most furore, conflict and general disputation. Däniken claims that either extraterrestrials, or humans who were aided by extraterrestrials, built Stonehenge. He then goes on to argue that Stonehenge is an exact replica of our solar system, including the asteroid belt.

Why not merge a visit to Stonehenge with visits to its nearby districts, which hold their own captivating and idiosyncratic attractions? A combination Bath and Stonehenge tour from London is one of the most extraordinary tours you can do. Bath is, without a doubt, one of the most absorbing destinations to explore in the UK. An especially great number of visitors assemble to view the extraordinary sunrise at the summer solstice.

Link: http://pressitt.com/smnr/Stonehenge-A-Sacred-Burial-Site/10709/

The Stonehenge Tour Company
http://www.StonehengeTours.com

 Stonehenge is a fascinating edifice to attempt to decode, and new theories are constantly arising regarding its origins and function.

Take a Stonehenge tour and delve into its mysteries: you are likely to be confounded by this imperious landmark.

 A great number of legends connected to Stonehenge have ranged in their assertions from stating that its construction originated fromStonehenge tour Ireland to those even claiming it began in Africa. It has even been maintained that wizards and giants had something to do with the building of this enigmatic structure.

 Yet all the evidence flies in the face of such high-flown assertions. The stones were engraved approximately around 3,000 BC. The positioning of the stones, conversely, dates back to 2,200 BC. Therefore, it is obvious that the creation of Stonehenge was not an instant phenomenal accomplishment. This wholly destabilises claims that the stones were positioned by giants or wizards, as it is obvious that it took much time, indeed, thousands of years, to form Stonehenge.

 Fairly recently, scientists, using the most modern technology available to them, have managed to go further back in time than before to the history of Stonehenge. They have contended that they have, as a result of this, made significant new discoveries about the enigmatic landmark. They have argued that the monument was already a very ancient ritualistic hub when the stones were raised over 5,000 years ago.

 Indeed, it is believed that by the time the primary megaliths of Stonehenge were elevated, it had already become a place of ritual import to the local populace. One theory is that, before the megaliths were added, Stonehenge in fact functioned as a cremation cemetery; hundreds of bodies were buried there. That seems to suggest that the ceremonial rituals, rather chillingly, may have involved deaths in the form of sacrifices.

 Another theory is that Stonehenge also might have been a site for sun worship a great deal of time before the legendary stones were put up over 5,000 years ago.

 Back in the 12th century, Henry of Huntingdon asserted of Stonehenge: ‘no one has been able to discover by what mechanism such vast masses of stone were elevated, nor for what purpose they were designed’.  The truly concrete facts behind the creation of Stonehenge are arguably as intangible, as difficult to assert as ever.

 Up to the modern age, the Stonehenge circle and earthworks are associated with—and employed by—many groups that claim there is a particular supernatural or divine significance to the landmark. Many do argue that some kind of unearthly authority is in attendance at Stonehenge, and this can be taken and channeled.

 Visit Stonehenge and become awed by the ineffable atmosphere that emanates from this grand landmark. Stonehenge is an exquisite monument, a momentous edifice that deserves your full scrutiny. Bask in the unique aura around this, some would say, otherworldly structure. Stonehenge tours offer an altogether different experience from any other tour.

The Stonehenge Tour Company
www.StonehengeTours.com

Take a Stonehenge coach tour with Golden Tours and find out why this landmark has amassed such renown and status.  Choose a special access tour for a truly unforgettable experience, with entry to the very core of Stonehenge itself.
Stonehenge tours

A world heritage site, Stonehenge is perhaps the most momentous of all the UK’s ancient landmarks. An extraordinary, almost overwhelmingly divine yet somehow obscure ambience pervades incomparable Stonehenge. These 40 tons of rocks have stood on Salisbury Hill for roughly 5,000 years. What was the purpose of Stonehenge? Was it used as a religious temple or possibly even as a Bronze Age burial ground?

With Golden Tours, you can decide between a Stonehenge morning tour or an evening tour. For the most ineffable, unutterably remarkable experience, however, you may want to take our Stonehenge special access tour. This grants you entry to the circle, for close proximity to the stones and a truly unsurpassed Stonehenge tour.

Visit beguiling Roman Bath and Lacock. The pastoral village of Lacock, dating back to the 13th century, overflows with its own charming appeal. It was a pulsating town for wool trade manufacturing during the Middle Ages. Bath was the first town in the whole of England to be afforded World Heritage status, and it is not hard to see why: it is pervaded with grandiose Roman ruins. Marvel at its varied imposing and noteworthy structures, such as its world celebrated spa, Pulteney Bridge (based on Florence’s Ponte Vecchio), and striking Bath Abbey.

There are a profusion of Stonehenge coach tours from London. Golden Tours’ offers a sweeping range of choices for tours, from Stonehenge, Bath, Windsor tours to the outstanding value ‘Simply Stonehenge’ tour. Yet, for the finest experience, choose Stonehenge special access tours. As has already been indicated, Stonehenge special access tours are arguably the most worthy tours to embark upon, as these will allow you to get much closer to the stones than you would on a standard Stonehenge tour.

A comprehensive variety of package day tours can fit the wishes of anyone who intends to experience for themselves the extraordinary marvel that is Stonehenge. For example, you can also try a Stonehenge, Bath, Windsor tour, and explore all three of these enchanting places. The highlight of Windsor is unquestionably Windsor Castle, a breathtaking structure that has enthralled inestimable numbers of visitors for centuries.

Theories flourish as to why exactly Stonehenge was built. See why it has motivated such debate: go on one of many Stonehenge tours from London.

Are you engrossed in the innumerable mysteries that encircle Stonehenge? Continual theories have spread as to why and how it was constructed, for what purpose it was built, and this imposing landmark has mystified many for centuries. Stonehenge tours from London are a perfect choice for those who are particularly deeply captivated by ambiguous, inscrutable Stonehenge, as such Stonehenge tours give you the ultimate experience.

For all your Stonehenge Tour requirements visit:
The Stonehenge Tour Companywww.StonehengeTours.com
Providing guided tours of Stonehenge since 1995

Stonehenge has become the most visited paid-for tourist attraction in the south west of England.

Figures from tourist board Visit England show the iconic Neolithic monument had more visitors last year than the Eden Project in Cornwall, the first time Stonehenge has surpassed the Cornish attraction since it opened in 2001.

In 2010 more than a million people visited the stone circle, which is up 1.9 per cent on the previous year, but overall the figures showed paid-for attractions suffered a decline of one per cent.

David Andrews, chief executive of Visit Wiltshire, said: “Stonehenge is a fabulous site and we’re extremely lucky to have it in the county.”

Peter Carson, head of Stonehenge at English Heritage, said: “Last year for the first time ever, Stonehenge attracted over a million visitors. We are delighted at its success.

“Visitors continue to be intrigued by these ancient stones and recent archaeological research undertaken within the World Heritage Site has helped to fuel this fascination.

This rise in visitors is also due to more overseas holiday makers, who are attracted to England by the favourable exchange rates and wish to see the UK’s premier prehistoric monument.”

Visit England surveyed 1,082 non-charging and paid-for tourist attractions and the British Museum was top with 5.8 million visitors last year.

Why not visit Stonehenge before the crowds arrive on one of our ‘Stonehenge Private Access’ Tours.  These must be booked in advance.

The Stonehenge Tour company
www.StonehengeTours.com

Thirteen kilometres north of Salisbury at the A303 roundabout, I motor west and 1.6 kilometres past the roundabout, there it is — looming in all its gargantuan glory for us to try to apprehend on a typically overcast afternoon in England.
Stonehenge Stone Circle, Wiltshire

The same country that produced the Rolling Stones provides us with stones of a much more stable nature, fixed in place for centuries; albeit these stones were actually moved some distance. Stonehenge, a 5,000-year-old stone circle puzzle, is the most famous prehistoric site in Europe. I park the car, amazed at how this mammoth entity suddenly manifests itself amidst the English plain.

And for what purpose?

Theories include an astronomical observatory, religious site, burial locale and a healing centre akin to that of Lourdes. Unfortunately, Stonehenge was created by those who left no written records; thus, many aspects remain subject to debate. Whatever its purpose, the precise design does include an observatory function. The two inner horseshoes are aligned along the rising and setting of the sun at the midsummer and midwinter solstices. Accordingly, the configuration allows for accurate predictions of eclipse, solstice, equinox and other celestial events.

These granite stones, some of which weigh as much as four tons, were reportedly dragged all the way from Marlborough Downs (North Wessex) and South Wales, 400 kilometres away! Erected in pairs, each is topped by an equally huge stone lintel. Within the inner circles stand two horseshoe-shaped arrangements, one within the other, and at the centre lies what is known as the Altar Stone. Further stones are to be found here and there within the site, which is surrounded by barrow mounds.

Years earlier, there was relatively easy access to the site, but that has changed. The stones can still be seen from the main car park, and can be viewed quite clearly from the roadside. Unlike the other monuments in the area, however, it’s necessary now to pay for an up close look. An entry fee of £7.50 for adults and £4.50 for children includes an audio guide and takes you through a tunnel under the road to the site. Generally, there is no direct access to the stone circle itself; visitors are guided around the monument by roped pathways and on-site attendants. The audio guide is available in several languages and lasts approximately 45 minutes. English Heritage and some tour operators from Salisbury can arrange early morning or evening visits that allow you to walk amidst the stones.

There are also daily tours of Stonehenge from London by coach.
Visit our website: http://www.StonehengeTours.com

From about 2500 B.C., Neolithic and Bronze Age man started to amass the Bluestones and Sarsen stones from Wales and the Marlborough Downs. It was not until 1600 BC that the complete structure of Stonehenge was finished. Most of the other monuments in the area, such as Durrington Walls and Woodhenge, date from the same period.

If you go

If you wish to play amateur Druid and check out Stonehenge during an actual solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, the longest day and shortest night of the year occur at the beginning of summer around June 20 or 21 when the sun is directly overhead at noon at the Tropic of Cancer. At winter solstice, about Dec. 22, the sun is overhead at noon at the Tropic of Capricorn and this marks the beginning of winter.

A nearby hill fort was built during the Iron Age, and there is evidence to suggest that the area was extensively settled by the Romans. The nearby town of Amesbury was later settled during the Saxon reign in 979 AD.

If you enjoy books the size and scope of War and Peace, to better understand Stonehenge try reading Sarum, historical fiction by Edward Rutherfurd which I have almost finished. Sarum, in the southwestern part of England, is the location of the ancient cathedral city, Salisbury, and a close neighbour of Stonehenge. Rutherfurd was born there, so he knows the place well, and in his first novel, he delves into Sarum’s pre-history to follow five families through the centuries in epic style reminiscent of James Michener.

Stonehenge is a World Heritage site. I’m not given to Druid superstitions and strange dreams about ritual sacrifice, but it gives me a weird sensation each time that I see it.

Mike Keenan is a Niagara-on- the-Lake based writer. Contact him at www.whattravelwriterssay.com

The Stonehenge Tour Company – Operating guided tours of Stonehenge since 1995
The Stonehenge Tour Company – www.StonehengeTours.com

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