Stone Circle Tours


After thousands of years, Stonehenge has had a makeover. But visitors may initially feel something is missing: the prehistoric monument itself. Tourists will now arrive at a gleaming new visitor center about a mile and a half from Stonehenge. It’s a teasing introduction, with a 360-degree Cinerama-style “virtual tour” along with an exhibition about the Neolithic Britons who built Stonehenge starting 5,000 years ago.

Visitors look at the audio-visual exhibits at Stonehenge  Alastair Grant / AP

Visitors look at the audio-visual exhibits at Stonehenge Alastair Grant / AP

The busy road that once ferried thousands of cars a day past the stones is being closed and grassed over, and visitors now will be bused to the stones on a special shuttle. Or they can walk, exploring paths and an ancient processional route that for years has been cut in half by asphalt.

2014 will prove a vintage year to visit Stonehenge.  Join a guided tour from London and experience the new visitor centre for yourself.  Stonehenge Guided Tours also offer special access tours giving a truly unique experience within the inner circle of Stonehenge at sunrise or sunset.
Visit their website here: http://www.StonehengeTours.com
Stonehenge Tour Guide

Avebury Stone Circle rivals – some would say exceeds – Stonehenge as the largest, most impressive and complex prehistoric site in Britain. 

Built and altered over many centuries from about 2850 BC to 2200 BC, it now appears as a huge circular bank and ditch, enclosing an area of 281 ⁄2 acres (111 ⁄2 hectares), including part of Avebury village.Within this ‘henge’ ditch is an inner circle of great standing stones, enclosing two more stone circles, each with a central feature.

Avebury Stone Circle Tours

The site’s present appearance owes much to the marmalade heir Alexander Keiller, who excavated and re-erected many stones during the 1930s, and whose archaeological collections are displayed in the nearby museum. Many stones had been broken or buried in medieval and later times, one crushing its destroyer as it fell.

Avebury is part of a wider complex of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments, with many other ritual sites in English Heritage care. West Kennet Avenue joined it to The Sanctuary, and another stone avenue connected it with Beckhampton. West Kennet Long Barrow and Windmill Hill are also nearby, as is the huge and mysterious Silbury Hill. This extraordinary assemblage of sites seemingly formed a huge ‘sacred landscape’, whose use and purpose can still only be guessed at. Avebury and its surroundings have, with Stonehenge, achieved international recognition as a World Heritage Site.

Avebury Henge and Stone Circles are in the freehold ownership of The National Trust and in English Heritage guardianship. They are managed by The National Trust on behalf of English Heritage, and the two organisations share the cost of managing and maintaining the property.

Take a tour of Stonehenge and discover more about the neolithic man and the landscape they shaped. At Avebury, walk amongst the stones, visit the Alexander Keiller Museum to find out about the arcaeological excavations Keiller did in the 1930s and visit the Avebury Manor and Garden, nearby West Kennet Long Barrow.

Avebury Links:
The Henge Shop – a unique location in the centre of Avebury, the largest prehistoric stone circle in the world.
English HeritageAvebury Stone Circle.
Stonehenge Guided Tours: Stonehenge and Avebury Stone Circle Tours
National Trust:  Avebury Visitor Information Centre
Visit Wiltshire:
Official Wiltshire Tourism Authority

Avebury News Updates:
Follow Avebury Stone Circle on Twitter for all the latest news and events.

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Stonehenge Stone Circle Tour Guide